Sakhu – life after the temblor

Love all, serve all

Sakhu is one of the more affected areas around Kathmandu. We drive around, seeing the temporary tin structures that have sprouted up alongside piles of rubble, and farmers working in their potato and rice fields. Life keeps going.

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Driving through Sakhu, we come across a feisty, come-what-may lady – “bajai” is what Nepalis call grandmas (we’d say “dadima” or “baa”). She’s working alongside young men and women that are family and friends, picking through the piles of rubble that have been gathered in an open space in front of the temporary shelters that locals who have lost their homes have built. She works with just as much (if not more) gusto.

We’re told they built their temporary shelters in 4 days. On the other side of the road, reconstruction is happening in earnest, a large machine whirring as laborers stand on the second story of a damaged building.

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She breezily recounts…

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Nepal’s Mammoth Tasks After the Earthquake

Roma Rajpal Weiss

The world watched helplessly over the past two months as heart-wrenching images streamed in from Nepal. An estimated 8,500 people were killed in a major earthquake and massive aftershock that slammed the Himalayan country within a span of three weeks. The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) has confirmed that 8.1 million people — nearly a third of the country’s population — are in need of humanitarian support, while another 1.9 million require food assistance.

Delivery of aid continues to remain a big challenge as many districts are inaccessible by roads. With the monsoon season around the corner, the UN warns that the affected communities are more vulnerable than ever to torrential rains and potential landslides.

The natural disaster strikes Nepal at a time when it is still grappling with the political and economic instability of the past decade. The Bertelsmann Stiftung’s Transformation Index (BTI) —…

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